Symposium Abstract: Issues in bimanual coordination: The props-based interface for neurosurgical visualization

I have a small backlog of updates and new posts to clear out, which I’ll be undertaking in the next few days.

The first of these is the following small abstract that actually dates from way back in 1996, shortly before I graduated with my Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Virginia.

It was a really fun symposium organized by the esteemed Yves Guiard, famous for his kinematic chain model of human bimanual action, that included myself and Bill Buxton, among others. For me this was a small but timely recognition that came early in my career and made it possible for me to take the stage alongside two of my biggest research heroes.

Thumbnail for Symposium on Human Bimanual SpecializationHinckley, K., 140.3: Issues in bimanual coordination: The props-based interface for neurosurgical visualization. Appeared in Symposium 140: Human bimanual specialization: New perspectives on basic research and application, convened by Yves Guiard, Montréal, Quebec, Canada, Aug. 17, 1996. Abstract published in  International Journal of Psychology, Volume 31, Issue 3-4, Special Issue: Abstracts of the XXVI INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF PSYCHOLOGY, 1996. [PDF – Symposium 140 Abstracts]

Abstract

I will describe a three-dimensional human-computer interface for neurosurgical visualization based on the bimanual manipulation of real-world tools. The user’s nonpreferred hand holds a miniature head that can be “sliced open” or “pointed to” using a cross-sectioning plane or a stylus held in the preferred hand. The nonpreferred hand acts as a dynamic frame-of-reference relative to which the preferred hand articulates its motion. I will also discuss experiments that investigate the role of bimanual action in virtual manipulation and in the design of human-computer interfaces in general.

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