Editorial: Welcome to a New Era for TOCHI

Wherein I tell the true story of how I became an Editor-in-Chief.


Constant change is a given in the world of high technology.

But still it can come as a rude awakening when it arrives in human terms, and we find that it also applies to our friends, our colleagues, and the people we care for.

Not to mention ourselves!

So it was that I found myself, with a tumbler full of fresh coffee steaming between my hands, looking in disbelief at an email nominating me to assume the editorial helm of the leading journal in my field, the ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (otherwise known as TOCHI).

Ultimately (through no fault of my own) the ACM Publications Board was apparently seized by a episode of temporary madness and, deeming my formal application to have the necessary qualifications (with a dozen years of TOCHI associate editorship under my belt, a membership in the CHI Academy for recognized leaders in the field, and a Lasting Impact Award for my early work on mobile sensing—not to mention hundreds of paper rejections that apparently did no lasting damage to my reputation) they forthwith approved me to take over as Editor-in-Chief from my friend and long-time colleague, Shumin Zhai.

I’ve known Shumin since 1994, way back when I delivered my very first talk at CHI in the same session as he presented his latest results on “the silk cursor.” I took an instant liking to him, but I only came to fully appreciate over the years that followed that Shumin’s work ethic is legendary. As my colleague Bill Buxton (who sat on Shumin’s thesis committee) once put it, “Shumin works harder than any two persons I have ever known.”

And of course that applied to Shumin’s work ethic with TOCHI as well.

A man who now represents an astoundingly large pair of shoes that I must fill.

To say that I respect Shumin enormously, and the incredible progress he brought to the operation and profile of the journal during his six-year tenure, would be a vast understatement.

But after I got over the sheer terror of taking on such an important role, I began to get excited.

And then I got ideas.

Lots of ideas.

A few of them might even be good ones:

Ways to advance the journal.

Ways to keep operating at peak efficiency in the face of an ever-expanding stream of submissions.

And most importantly, ways to deliver even more impact to our readers, and on behalf of our authors.

Those same authors whose contributions make it possible for us to proclaim:

TOCHI is the flagship journal of the Computer-Human Interaction community.

So in this, my introductory editorial as the head honcho, new sheriff in town, and supreme benevolent dictator otherwise known as the Editor-in-Chief, I would like to talk about how the transition is going, give a few updates on TOCHI’s standard operating procedure, and—with an eye towards growing the impact of the journal—announce the first of what I hope will be many exciting new initiatives.

And in case it is not already obvious, I intend to have some fun with this.

All while preserving the absolutely rigorous and top-notch reputation of the journal, and the constant push for excellence in all of the papers that we publish.

[Read the rest at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2882897]


Be sure to also check out The Editor’s Spotlight, highlighting the many strong contributions in this issue. This, along with the full text of my introductory editorial, is available without an ACM Digital Library subscription via the links below.


_TOCHI-thumbKen Hinckley. 2016. Editorial: Welcome to a New Era for TOCHI. ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum. Interact 23, 1: Article 1e (February 2016), 6 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2882897

_TOCHI-thumbKen Hinckley. 2016. The Editor’s Spotlight: TOCHI Issue 23:1. ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum. Interact 23, 1: Article 1 (February 2016), 4 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2882899

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